'The Sea' Exclusive Clip

FemaleFirst, 16 April 2014
By Helen Earnshaw
Thanks, Midoro

'The Sea' hits the big screen this week and looks set to be a drama that is not to be missed.

'The Sea is a big screen adaptation of the novel by John Banville, and sees Stephen Brown in the director's chair. The movie will mark the feature film directorial debut for Brown, as he makes the transition from shorts for the first time.

FemaleFirst has a fantastic exclusive clip to share with you ahead of the film's release at the end of the week.

2014 has already been the year of the great cast lists, and 'The Sea' is set to continue that fine tradition.

Ciaran Hinds will lead that cast, and is joined by Natascha McElhone, Rufus Sewell, Charlotte Rampling, and Bonnie Wright: a great mix of youth and experience.

Grieving after the death of his wife, art historian Max Morden (Hinds) returns to the sleepy seaside resort where he spent summers as a child.' Max lodges at a boarding house he once frequented, where frosty proprietor Miss Vavasour (Rampling), and eccentric resident Blunden (Karl Johnson), now reside. Before long - and despite protestations from his daughter Clare (Ruth Bradley) - Max revisits the ghosts of his past.

Max's mind returns to an idyllic summer in 1955 when, as a child, he encountered the Grace family. Carlo (Rufus Sewell) and Connie (Natascha McElhone) were unlike any adults he had met before: nonchalant, bohemian, and filled with worldly grace and candour.

Young Max (Matthew Dillon) befriends the young Grace twins, Chloe (Missy Keating) and Myles (Padhraig Parkinson), and his fascination for this unconventional clan transforms into intimacy and love. Meanwhile, the children's young nanny Rose (Bonnie Wright), an outsider like Max, regards the Grace's new surrogate with quiet suspicion.

While Max attempts to deal with the loss of his wife, and recalls moments with his departed partner Anna (Sinéad Cusack), he also confronts a distant trauma from the past.

'The Sea' is a haunting, uplifting, meditation on the human condition - at times elegiac, poetic, and nostalgic. A story of memory, love, loss, regret... and the persistent possibility of rebirth

The Sea is released this Friday.


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